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president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two people on that. if you assume that he is going to do what he said he's going to do, i think a lot of his priorities will be enacted. and i think it will be bad on the budget side, as i said. includin
who has a remarkable story about death in iraq and reunion in the united states. >> the i interviewed a guy in the peace, a psychiatrist who used the term moral injury and he said a lot of soldiers and marines stuff from moral injury, which he described as sort of it happens when you get an order, you do something that you believe at the time was absolutely correct and the only thing you could do, and it turns out to have been, to have terrible consequences. that is basically what happened here. >> rose: american foreign policy and a dexter filkins story. when we come back. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. additional funding provided by these funders. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with the 2012 election last night, president obama and mitt romney balanced it out in the third and final debate. at lynn university in boca raton florida, the suggest was foreign policy but discussion often veered toward domestic concerns as well, the two men addressed a range o
. >> rose: how much of that is borne by the united states, both in terms of budget and in terms of resources? >> a lot, of course. the united states is the biggest ally accounting for around 80% of the overall defense expenditure in our alliance. so it really is a huge contribution. but politically i think it's of jut most importance also for a superpower like the united states to have allies in europe, like-minded democracies. i find it of utmost importance that democracies in europe and north america stand together shoulder to shoulder to defend our common values. >> rose: when you talk about missile defense, against missiles coming from where? >> well, actually, our missile defense system is not directed against any specific country but it aims at protecting our populations against missile threats from wherever. >> rose: incoming missiles from wherever they come from? >> exactly. and we know that more than 30 countries around the world have missile technologies rohr aspiring to get missle technologies, some of them with a range to hit population centers in europe. so we want to protect ou
of tension between the prime minister of israel and the president of the united states. but all of that is entirely obama's fault. anything that's wrong with the u.s./israel relationship is obama's fault. the fact that the prime minister of israel has continued with a settlement policy which is extremely controversial in israel somehow comes no where into the equation. so we're supposed to blieve on the one hand that america's supposed to lead the arab world from the front with one hand while adopting a policy toward israel that is more pro-israeli than anything any government in washington has articulated for a long time. how the two of them will go together i don't know. and for good measure, though-- and i think this is praiseworthy-- governor romney has called for a palestinian state and a two-state solution, something on other occasions he's been less than supportive of. so it's kind of a mishmash for me. that's how i see it. >> rose: a couple things. one, on syria, he seems to want to support the rebels with arms, at least. that's different. >> yeah. and here i think -- i
the united states. why did the 13 colonies develop as they do? one of the reasons was it was jam packed with natural well-protected harbors in the northeast. and the tempered zone of what is now the united states, it was last resource-rich part of the temperate zone that was settled by europeans at the time of the enlightenment and it had more miles of inland waterways than the rest of the world combined. so that enabled the develment of american nationhood. these facts are so obvious that they get overlooked in the current debate. >> rose: i want to take different countries and look at it to understand your thesis, both in terms of their history and future and elements of their geography that make them who they are take china today. >> okay. all right. take china. china has two big geographical issues. on the one hand, china is big, it's vast. because it's stretching out in terms of the its corporate enterprises, its demography into he ruian far east where there's always this timber, diamonds and gold that the chinese want. a hundred million people in manchuria over the boarder in the
that we are very close to the united states which is clearly an advantage, but also we are investing a lot of infrastructure and in a very important thing, charlie, which is human capital. we have built in this six years 140 new universities from greenfields, public and free tuition universities. and we add there are like 113,000 new engineers graduating every year in mexico so today there are more engineers every year than in germany or u.k. or canada or brazil. and with that, a lot of companies, american and global companies are realizing that mexico is very, very competitive in manufacturing, for instance. even vis-a-vis china. >> rose: ed thing we read about are two big issues, one is narco terrorism. what is it going to take to win that battle? the second is immigration. >> well first a lot of courage, because otherwise it is impossible to deal with that. and you need to have the principals that no one nation could prosper without rule of law. because that is exactly our main focus, in the sense that we are not prosecuting drugs by drugs themselves. we are looking for rule of law in m
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 197 (some duplicates have been removed)